Media: Slideshow

Antisuffrage Viewpoints

His Daughter!

An illustration published in the February 12, 1915, edition of Puck magazine depicts the horrified expression of a father, who opposes women securing the vote, as he watches his suffragist daughter addressing a crowd. The subtitle of the drawing reads, "And he thought she was 'just a little girl.'" Puck, a humor magazine based in New York City, supported suffrage for women and commissioned a series of illustrations that poked fun at the antisuffragist point of view. 

Citation: Puck, AP101 .P7. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Original Author: W. E. Hill

Created: February 20, 1915

Medium: Magazine illustration

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia

Anti-Suffrage Arguments

This broadside produced by the Virginia Association Opposed to Woman's Suffrage warns that if women are permitted to vote it will lead to socialism, which, the organization believes, is opposed to Christian religion, marriage, family, and private property. The document asserts that "danger lies ahead," and the way to stop it is as follows:

If you hold your marriage, your family life, your home, your religion, as sacred, dear and inviolate, to be preserved for yourself, and for your children, for all time, then work with all your might against Socialism's vanguard—Woman's Suffrage. 

Original Author: Virginia Association Opposed to Woman's Suffrage

Created: 1910s

Medium: Broadside

Courtesy of Library of Virginia

An Anti-Suffrage Viewpoint

This satirical drawing published in the January 23, 1915, edition of the humor magazine Puck pokes fun at the double standard of some who oppose woman suffrage. The illustration depicts a New Year's Eve party at a nightclub, during which a tuxedoed man accompanied by a woman unexpectedly spies his wife across the room. "I'll bet she's looking for me!", he tells his "fair companion," who replies, "Oh, dear! Why can't some people understand that woman's place is in the home?"

Citation: Puck, AP101 .P7. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Original Author: W. E. Hill

Created: January 23, 1915

Medium: Magazine illustration

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia

"I Did Not Raise My Girl to Be a Voter"

An illustration published in the October 9, 1915, edition of Puck magazine depicts a "political boss" conducting a chorus with an antisuffragist woman at its center. Behind her and joining her in song with their "vociferous" voices are men who oppose women acquiring the vote, as they fear the social reforms that might result. The men's unsavory occupations are noted: a "procurer," a "dive-keeper," a "child labor employer," a "grafter," a "cadet" (an archaic slang term referring to a man who puts young women into brothels), and a "sweat-shop owner." Puck, a humor magazine based in New York City, supported suffrage for women and commissioned a series of illustrations that poked fun at the antisuffragist point of view.

Original Author: Kenneth Russell Chamberlain

Created: October 9, 1915

Medium: Magazine illustration

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

A group of unidentified men look at materials posted in the window of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, an organization founded by women in 1911. A Virginia chapter of the association was established in Richmond the following year.

Original Author: Harris & Ewing, photographer

Created: ca. 1911

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Making the Polls Attractive to the Anti-Suffragists

New York : Published by Puck Publishing Corporation, 295-309 Lafayette Street, 1915 February 20.

 

Illustration shows society women playing cards and dancing rather than voting; only one woman has taken time away from socializing to cast a ballot into a ballot box brought to her card table; an unmarked ballot rests on a cushion next to a woman in the foreground.

 

Illus. in: Puck, v. 77, no. 1981 (1915 February 20), p. 16.

 

http://suffrageandthemedia.org/source/puck-magazine-suffrage-issue/

Original Author: Ralph Barton

Created: February 20, 1915

Medium: Color photomechanical print

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

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  • His Daughter!

    An illustration published in the February 12, 1915, edition of Puck magazine depicts the horrified expression of a father, who opposes women securing the vote, as he watches his suffragist daughter addressing a crowd. The subtitle of the drawing reads, "And he thought she was 'just a little girl.'" Puck, a humor magazine based in New York City, supported suffrage for women and commissioned a series of illustrations that poked fun at the antisuffragist point of view. 

    Citation: Puck, AP101 .P7. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

    Original Author: W. E. Hill

    Created: February 20, 1915

    Medium: Magazine illustration

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia

  • Anti-Suffrage Arguments

    This broadside produced by the Virginia Association Opposed to Woman's Suffrage warns that if women are permitted to vote it will lead to socialism, which, the organization believes, is opposed to Christian religion, marriage, family, and private property. The document asserts that "danger lies ahead," and the way to stop it is as follows:

    If you hold your marriage, your family life, your home, your religion, as sacred, dear and inviolate, to be preserved for yourself, and for your children, for all time, then work with all your might against Socialism's vanguard—Woman's Suffrage. 

    Original Author: Virginia Association Opposed to Woman's Suffrage

    Created: 1910s

    Medium: Broadside

    Courtesy of Library of Virginia

  • An Anti-Suffrage Viewpoint

    This satirical drawing published in the January 23, 1915, edition of the humor magazine Puck pokes fun at the double standard of some who oppose woman suffrage. The illustration depicts a New Year's Eve party at a nightclub, during which a tuxedoed man accompanied by a woman unexpectedly spies his wife across the room. "I'll bet she's looking for me!", he tells his "fair companion," who replies, "Oh, dear! Why can't some people understand that woman's place is in the home?"

    Citation: Puck, AP101 .P7. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

    Original Author: W. E. Hill

    Created: January 23, 1915

    Medium: Magazine illustration

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia

  • "I Did Not Raise My Girl to Be a Voter"

    An illustration published in the October 9, 1915, edition of Puck magazine depicts a "political boss" conducting a chorus with an antisuffragist woman at its center. Behind her and joining her in song with their "vociferous" voices are men who oppose women acquiring the vote, as they fear the social reforms that might result. The men's unsavory occupations are noted: a "procurer," a "dive-keeper," a "child labor employer," a "grafter," a "cadet" (an archaic slang term referring to a man who puts young women into brothels), and a "sweat-shop owner." Puck, a humor magazine based in New York City, supported suffrage for women and commissioned a series of illustrations that poked fun at the antisuffragist point of view.

    Original Author: Kenneth Russell Chamberlain

    Created: October 9, 1915

    Medium: Magazine illustration

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

    A group of unidentified men look at materials posted in the window of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, an organization founded by women in 1911. A Virginia chapter of the association was established in Richmond the following year.

    Original Author: Harris & Ewing, photographer

    Created: ca. 1911

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Making the Polls Attractive to the Anti-Suffragists

    New York : Published by Puck Publishing Corporation, 295-309 Lafayette Street, 1915 February 20.

     

    Illustration shows society women playing cards and dancing rather than voting; only one woman has taken time away from socializing to cast a ballot into a ballot box brought to her card table; an unmarked ballot rests on a cushion next to a woman in the foreground.

     

    Illus. in: Puck, v. 77, no. 1981 (1915 February 20), p. 16.

     

    http://suffrageandthemedia.org/source/puck-magazine-suffrage-issue/

    Original Author: Ralph Barton

    Created: February 20, 1915

    Medium: Color photomechanical print

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division