Media: Slideshow

Festival Promoting Winchester's Apple Industry

Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival

Young people in costume hold a maypole as they parade through the streets of Winchester on April 24, 1930, to celebrate the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival. Sue Pollard, the daughter of Governor John Garland Pollard, was crowned "Queen of the Apple Blossoms" that year. The festival, which began in 1924, was designed to promote the Shenandoah Valley and its apple industry. The influential politician Harry F. Byrd, who was raised in Winchester and was involved in the apple business, helped organize the festival which, he wrote, was "conceived and arranged to bring visitors from far and wide to Winchester and Frederick County that they might see the grandeur of our land at the time of its greatest beauty—apple blossom time."

Original Author: Harris & Ewing, photographer

Created: April 24, 1930

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Float in the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Parade

A float with young women dressed in colonial-era garb proceeds down a street in Winchester on April 24, 1925, during a parade for the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: April 24, 1925

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival Queen

Eleanor Childs, a young white woman dressed in Indian garb, poses amid apple blossoms on April 24, 1925, during the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in Winchester. Childs was crowned "Queen Shenandoah" of the festival. The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers into the Shenandoah Valley during the colonial period and their encounters with the local Indians. Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: April 24, 1925

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Festival Queen and Her Court of Princesses

Princess Shenandoah, the queen of the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in 1925, stands behind her court of princesses at the back of a float during the festival's annual parade in Winchester. The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers into the Shenandoah Valley during the colonial period and their encounters with the local Indians.Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: April 24, 1925

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Apple Blossom Festival Pageant

In a pageant enacted during the April 1925 Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival, a man dressed in powdered wig and colonial garb ascends a stairway to reach Queen Shenandoah, a Virginia Indian (though played here by a white woman). The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers in the area and their encounters with the local Indians. Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

 

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: April 24, 1925

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival Event

As part of the pageantry surrounding the 1925 Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in Winchester, an officiant dressed in Quaker clothing apparently blesses the marriage of a white colonial-era settler in the Shenandoah Valley to Queen Shenandoah, a Virginia Indian (though played here by a white woman). The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers in the area and their encounters with the local Indians. Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: April 24. 1925

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

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  • Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival

    Young people in costume hold a maypole as they parade through the streets of Winchester on April 24, 1930, to celebrate the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival. Sue Pollard, the daughter of Governor John Garland Pollard, was crowned "Queen of the Apple Blossoms" that year. The festival, which began in 1924, was designed to promote the Shenandoah Valley and its apple industry. The influential politician Harry F. Byrd, who was raised in Winchester and was involved in the apple business, helped organize the festival which, he wrote, was "conceived and arranged to bring visitors from far and wide to Winchester and Frederick County that they might see the grandeur of our land at the time of its greatest beauty—apple blossom time."

    Original Author: Harris & Ewing, photographer

    Created: April 24, 1930

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Float in the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Parade

    A float with young women dressed in colonial-era garb proceeds down a street in Winchester on April 24, 1925, during a parade for the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: April 24, 1925

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival Queen

    Eleanor Childs, a young white woman dressed in Indian garb, poses amid apple blossoms on April 24, 1925, during the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in Winchester. Childs was crowned "Queen Shenandoah" of the festival. The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers into the Shenandoah Valley during the colonial period and their encounters with the local Indians. Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: April 24, 1925

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Festival Queen and Her Court of Princesses

    Princess Shenandoah, the queen of the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in 1925, stands behind her court of princesses at the back of a float during the festival's annual parade in Winchester. The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers into the Shenandoah Valley during the colonial period and their encounters with the local Indians.Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: April 24, 1925

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Apple Blossom Festival Pageant

    In a pageant enacted during the April 1925 Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival, a man dressed in powdered wig and colonial garb ascends a stairway to reach Queen Shenandoah, a Virginia Indian (though played here by a white woman). The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers in the area and their encounters with the local Indians. Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

     

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: April 24, 1925

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival Event

    As part of the pageantry surrounding the 1925 Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in Winchester, an officiant dressed in Quaker clothing apparently blesses the marriage of a white colonial-era settler in the Shenandoah Valley to Queen Shenandoah, a Virginia Indian (though played here by a white woman). The official events that year highlighted the arrival of white settlers in the area and their encounters with the local Indians. Those interactions were depicted as having been peaceful and harmonious.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: April 24. 1925

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division