Media: Slideshow

E. Lee Trinkle's Tenure as Governor

E. Lee Trinkle for Governor

A political broadside promotes E. Lee Trinkle in the Democratic primary for governor on August 2, 1921. Looking "Forward—Not Backward" is the motto ascribed to the candidate who emphasized his business acumen. Trinkle easily won the primary with 57 percent of the vote and went on to win the general election.

Citation: E. Lee Trinkle for governor of Virginia: campaign literature. Broadside 1921 .D456. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: E. Lee Trinkle for Governor

Created: 1921

Medium: Political broadside

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

Governor E. Lee Trinkle

Governor E. Lee Trinkle tips his top hat in this news photograph. Though the unverified caption data on the negative sleeve at the Library of Congress dates the image as February 22, 1923, the details in the image—Trinkle's formal dress, the open car procession, and the bunting on the building in the background—bear the hallmarks of an inaugural parade. Trinkle was inaugurated as governor of Virginia on February 1, 1922.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: Probably February 1, 1922

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Governor E. Lee Trinkle and the "Baby Blues"

Governor E. Lee Trinkle, at left, poses on the steps of the Capitol in Richmond in 1925 with the "Baby Blues," an all-boys military unit. The name of the group was probably derived from the Richmond Light Infantry Blues, a military unit that began in 1789 as a volunteer militia. The unit saw active service after the discovery of Gabriel's Conspiracy in 1800, during the War of 1812, and in aftermath of Nat Turner Revolt in 1831 and John Brown's 1859 raid on Harper's Ferry. The unit was subsequently incorporated into the Confederate army. The Richmond Blues also served during the Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II, the Korean War, and the Berlin Crisis. The Blues were disestablished in 1968 when the National Guard was reorganized.

Original Author: Faris & Dementi Studio

Created: 1925

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Governor Harry F. Byrd's Inauguration

Departing Governor E. Lee Trinkle (left) poses with the new governor, Harry F. Byrd (right), at the inauguration ceremony in 1926. During Trinkle's term as governor from 1922 until 1926, he was opposed by Byrd, a state senator, over the question of financing for public highways. Trinkle supported a statewide bond issue to pay for highway construction, while Byrd gathered support for gas taxes instead. Byrd and his "pay-as-you-go" advocates eventually defeated the bond issue both in the General Assembly and later in a public referendum. The issue helped establish the ascendancy of Byrd and his political organization, which became the dominant political machine in Virginia politics for the next several decades.

Original Author: Richmond Times-Dispatch

Created: 1926

Medium: Photograph

Courtesy of the Richmond Times-Dispatch

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  • E. Lee Trinkle for Governor

    A political broadside promotes E. Lee Trinkle in the Democratic primary for governor on August 2, 1921. Looking "Forward—Not Backward" is the motto ascribed to the candidate who emphasized his business acumen. Trinkle easily won the primary with 57 percent of the vote and went on to win the general election.

    Citation: E. Lee Trinkle for governor of Virginia: campaign literature. Broadside 1921 .D456. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: E. Lee Trinkle for Governor

    Created: 1921

    Medium: Political broadside

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

  • Governor E. Lee Trinkle

    Governor E. Lee Trinkle tips his top hat in this news photograph. Though the unverified caption data on the negative sleeve at the Library of Congress dates the image as February 22, 1923, the details in the image—Trinkle's formal dress, the open car procession, and the bunting on the building in the background—bear the hallmarks of an inaugural parade. Trinkle was inaugurated as governor of Virginia on February 1, 1922.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: Probably February 1, 1922

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Governor E. Lee Trinkle and the "Baby Blues"

    Governor E. Lee Trinkle, at left, poses on the steps of the Capitol in Richmond in 1925 with the "Baby Blues," an all-boys military unit. The name of the group was probably derived from the Richmond Light Infantry Blues, a military unit that began in 1789 as a volunteer militia. The unit saw active service after the discovery of Gabriel's Conspiracy in 1800, during the War of 1812, and in aftermath of Nat Turner Revolt in 1831 and John Brown's 1859 raid on Harper's Ferry. The unit was subsequently incorporated into the Confederate army. The Richmond Blues also served during the Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II, the Korean War, and the Berlin Crisis. The Blues were disestablished in 1968 when the National Guard was reorganized.

    Original Author: Faris & Dementi Studio

    Created: 1925

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Governor Harry F. Byrd's Inauguration

    Departing Governor E. Lee Trinkle (left) poses with the new governor, Harry F. Byrd (right), at the inauguration ceremony in 1926. During Trinkle's term as governor from 1922 until 1926, he was opposed by Byrd, a state senator, over the question of financing for public highways. Trinkle supported a statewide bond issue to pay for highway construction, while Byrd gathered support for gas taxes instead. Byrd and his "pay-as-you-go" advocates eventually defeated the bond issue both in the General Assembly and later in a public referendum. The issue helped establish the ascendancy of Byrd and his political organization, which became the dominant political machine in Virginia politics for the next several decades.

    Original Author: Richmond Times-Dispatch

    Created: 1926

    Medium: Photograph

    Courtesy of the Richmond Times-Dispatch