Media: Slideshow

Kenmore Mansion

Kenmore

This Georgian-style brick mansion in Fredericksburg, was built in the 1770s for Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington Lewis, the sister of George Washington. In 1819, a later owner, Samuel Gordon, named the house Kenmore and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

Created: Twenty-first century

Medium: Digital photograph

Courtesy of The George Washington Foundation

Kenmore's Chamber Room

A depiction of Apollo, the sun god in classical mythology, is at the center of this elaborate plasterwork ceiling in the chamber room at Kenmore, in Fredericksburg. The mansion was built in the 1770s by the merchant Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington Lewis. In 1819 a later owner, Samuel Gordon, named it Kenmore and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. The house features several rooms with intricately designed ceilings, the work of an unnamed "Stucco Man," who also created the plaster decorations on the ceiling in the small dining room at Mount Vernon.

Original Author: "Stucco Man"

Created: 1770s

Medium: Digital photograph

Courtesy of The George Washington Foundation

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  • Kenmore

    This Georgian-style brick mansion in Fredericksburg, was built in the 1770s for Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington Lewis, the sister of George Washington. In 1819, a later owner, Samuel Gordon, named the house Kenmore and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

    Created: Twenty-first century

    Medium: Digital photograph

    Courtesy of The George Washington Foundation

  • Kenmore's Chamber Room

    A depiction of Apollo, the sun god in classical mythology, is at the center of this elaborate plasterwork ceiling in the chamber room at Kenmore, in Fredericksburg. The mansion was built in the 1770s by the merchant Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington Lewis. In 1819 a later owner, Samuel Gordon, named it Kenmore and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. The house features several rooms with intricately designed ceilings, the work of an unnamed "Stucco Man," who also created the plaster decorations on the ceiling in the small dining room at Mount Vernon.

    Original Author: "Stucco Man"

    Created: 1770s

    Medium: Digital photograph

    Courtesy of The George Washington Foundation