Media: Slideshow

Upper Bremo Plantation

Bremo

The Bremo plantation house in Fluvanna County, which dates to about 1820, is a five-section Palladian mansion designed by its owner, John Hartwell Cocke, and John Neilson, a master craftsman who worked for Thomas Jefferson.

Original Author: John Hartwell Cocke and John Neilson

Created: ca. 1820

Medium: Photograph

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Stone Barn at Bremo

This unusual stone barn at Fluvanna County's Bremo plantation, which dates to about 1820, features a Tuscan portico and a central cupola. John Hartwell Cocke, the owner of Bremo, designed the plantation buildings with John Neilson, a master craftsman who worked for Thomas Jefferson.

This photograph was made by Frances Benjamin Johnston, a well-known photographer from Washington, D.C., who documented historic buildings and gardens throughout the South late in the 1920s and the 1930s as part of the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South.

Citation: Frances Benjamin Johnston Photographic Collection, Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia Libraries, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: Frances Benjamin Johnston

Created: 1929–1935

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia

Floor Plan of Bremo

An engraved plan of Bremo, John Hartwell Cocke's plantation mansion on Bremo Bluff in Fluvanna County, gives a detailed rendering of the Palladian structure's ground floor rooms. The central living quarters are connected by roofed passageways to outlying wings. Cocke designed Bremo with John Neilson, a master craftsman who worked for Thomas Jefferson and helped build both Monticello and Montpelier. Cocke included a schoolhouse in the west outbuilding so that the enslaved children on the planation could be educated.

Original Author: John Hartwell Cocke and John Neilson, architects

Created: ca. 1820

Medium: Engraved architectural plan

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Schoolhouse at Bremo

This photograph depicts the interior of the schoolhouse where enslaved children were educated at Bremo, John Hartwell Cocke's early nineteenth-century plantation in Fluvanna County. The school's original wooden benches are seen here, as well as various pedagogical tools: an abacus, a reading chart, animal posters featuring letters, and a copy of the Ten Commandments broken into syllables. A poster leaning on the mantel urges students to "Be Content With such Thing[s] As Ye Have." Cocke hired teachers from the North to educate the slaves until Virginia outlawed the practice; at other times Cocke's second wife, Louisa Holmes Cocke, served as teacher.

This photograph was made by Frances Benjamin Johnston, a well-known photographer from Washington, D.C., who documented historic buildings and gardens throughout the South late in the 1920s and the 1930s as part of the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South.

Citation: Frances Benjamin Johnston Photographic Collection, Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia Libraries, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: Frances Benjamin Johnston

Created: 1929–1935

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia

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  • Bremo

    The Bremo plantation house in Fluvanna County, which dates to about 1820, is a five-section Palladian mansion designed by its owner, John Hartwell Cocke, and John Neilson, a master craftsman who worked for Thomas Jefferson.

    Original Author: John Hartwell Cocke and John Neilson

    Created: ca. 1820

    Medium: Photograph

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Stone Barn at Bremo

    This unusual stone barn at Fluvanna County's Bremo plantation, which dates to about 1820, features a Tuscan portico and a central cupola. John Hartwell Cocke, the owner of Bremo, designed the plantation buildings with John Neilson, a master craftsman who worked for Thomas Jefferson.

    This photograph was made by Frances Benjamin Johnston, a well-known photographer from Washington, D.C., who documented historic buildings and gardens throughout the South late in the 1920s and the 1930s as part of the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South.

    Citation: Frances Benjamin Johnston Photographic Collection, Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia Libraries, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: Frances Benjamin Johnston

    Created: 1929–1935

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia

  • Floor Plan of Bremo

    An engraved plan of Bremo, John Hartwell Cocke's plantation mansion on Bremo Bluff in Fluvanna County, gives a detailed rendering of the Palladian structure's ground floor rooms. The central living quarters are connected by roofed passageways to outlying wings. Cocke designed Bremo with John Neilson, a master craftsman who worked for Thomas Jefferson and helped build both Monticello and Montpelier. Cocke included a schoolhouse in the west outbuilding so that the enslaved children on the planation could be educated.

    Original Author: John Hartwell Cocke and John Neilson, architects

    Created: ca. 1820

    Medium: Engraved architectural plan

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Schoolhouse at Bremo

    This photograph depicts the interior of the schoolhouse where enslaved children were educated at Bremo, John Hartwell Cocke's early nineteenth-century plantation in Fluvanna County. The school's original wooden benches are seen here, as well as various pedagogical tools: an abacus, a reading chart, animal posters featuring letters, and a copy of the Ten Commandments broken into syllables. A poster leaning on the mantel urges students to "Be Content With such Thing[s] As Ye Have." Cocke hired teachers from the North to educate the slaves until Virginia outlawed the practice; at other times Cocke's second wife, Louisa Holmes Cocke, served as teacher.

    This photograph was made by Frances Benjamin Johnston, a well-known photographer from Washington, D.C., who documented historic buildings and gardens throughout the South late in the 1920s and the 1930s as part of the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South.

    Citation: Frances Benjamin Johnston Photographic Collection, Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia Libraries, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: Frances Benjamin Johnston

    Created: 1929–1935

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia