Media: Slideshow

An Anti-Tobacco Broadside

A Kind Word to Lads, on Tobacco.

A nineteenth-century broadside warns young boys of the dangers of smoking, which include illness and death. The handbill also claims that tobacco can be responsible for "inducing a dangerous precocity, developing the passions, softening the bones, and injuring the spinal marrow and whole nervous fluid." This "kind word to lads" is credited to "Uncle Toby," a beloved fictional character in Laurence Sterne's The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, a best-selling novel published in nine volumes between 1759 and 1767.

This anti-tobacco sheet is included in the collection of John Hartwell Cocke's papers at the University of Virginia. Cocke, a Fluvanna County plantation owner and reformer, opposed the cultivation and use of tobacco. He circulated anti-tobacco tracts in Virginia and distributed medals to boys who promised never to indulge in the substance.

Citation: John Hartwell Cocke Papers, 1725–1931, Accession #640. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: "Uncle Toby"

Created: Undated

Medium: Broadside

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

Harry Puffer in his best estate. and The Dandy with his Ninepenny Havana.

Characters called Harry Puffer and the Dandy are depicted on the reverse side of an anti-tobacco broadside that warns young boys of the dangers of smoking. This broadside is included in the collection of John Hartwell Cocke's papers at the University of Virginia. Cocke, a Fluvanna County plantation owner and reformer, opposed the cultivation and use of tobacco. He circulated anti-tobacco tracts in Virginia and distributed medals to boys who promised never to indulge in the substance.

Citation: John Hartwell Cocke Papers, 1725–1931. Accession #640. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: E. L. B., artist (top); Alfred R. Waud, artist, and G. H. Haynes, engraver (bottom)

Created: Nineteenth century

Medium: Engravings

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

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  • A Kind Word to Lads, on Tobacco.

    A nineteenth-century broadside warns young boys of the dangers of smoking, which include illness and death. The handbill also claims that tobacco can be responsible for "inducing a dangerous precocity, developing the passions, softening the bones, and injuring the spinal marrow and whole nervous fluid." This "kind word to lads" is credited to "Uncle Toby," a beloved fictional character in Laurence Sterne's The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, a best-selling novel published in nine volumes between 1759 and 1767.

    This anti-tobacco sheet is included in the collection of John Hartwell Cocke's papers at the University of Virginia. Cocke, a Fluvanna County plantation owner and reformer, opposed the cultivation and use of tobacco. He circulated anti-tobacco tracts in Virginia and distributed medals to boys who promised never to indulge in the substance.

    Citation: John Hartwell Cocke Papers, 1725–1931, Accession #640. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: "Uncle Toby"

    Created: Undated

    Medium: Broadside

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

  • Harry Puffer in his best estate. and The Dandy with his Ninepenny Havana.

    Characters called Harry Puffer and the Dandy are depicted on the reverse side of an anti-tobacco broadside that warns young boys of the dangers of smoking. This broadside is included in the collection of John Hartwell Cocke's papers at the University of Virginia. Cocke, a Fluvanna County plantation owner and reformer, opposed the cultivation and use of tobacco. He circulated anti-tobacco tracts in Virginia and distributed medals to boys who promised never to indulge in the substance.

    Citation: John Hartwell Cocke Papers, 1725–1931. Accession #640. Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: E. L. B., artist (top); Alfred R. Waud, artist, and G. H. Haynes, engraver (bottom)

    Created: Nineteenth century

    Medium: Engravings

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections