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Academic Ceremonies and Honors

J. H. Dillard Confers Honorary Degree

On October 30, 1921, J. H. Dillard, the rector of the College of William and Mary, confers an honorary degree on President Warren G. Harding. Dillard served on the Board of Visitors from 1918 until 1940.

Citation: Dillard Family Papers, 1717–1964, Accession #9498. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: October 30, 1921

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

Telegram Concerning Dillard University

A May 27, 1934, telegram from officials at Xavier University in New Orleans congratulates J. H. Dillard on the impending opening of a new African American university named in his honor. Dillard University, which combined New Orleans University and Straight College into one institution, was chartered in 1930 but did not commence operation until the autumn of 1935. Xavier University was a historically black, Catholic institution initially established as a secondary school by Sister Katherine Drexel. (Drexel, who founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament, was later canonized as a saint.) In the telegram, the Xavier officials compare Dillard to Drexel, since both have "been to the Negro cause through the years a light shining in darkness." 

Citation: Dillard Family Papers, 1717–1964, Accession #9498. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: Reverend Edward F. Murphy, Sister Madeline Sophie, and the faculty of Xavier University

Created: May 27, 1934

Medium: Telegram

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

J. H. Dillard at Talladega College

The educational reformer J. H. Dillard, at center, is dressed in academic garb on the occasion of a talk he delivered on April 3, 1934, at Talladega College, a historically black college in Alabama. Buell Gallagher, the president of the college, writes above the photograph and thanks Dillard for his "kindly and gracious words … [that] have given wings of hope."

Citation: Dillard Family Papers, 1717–1964, Accession #9498. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: April 3, 1934

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

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  • J. H. Dillard Confers Honorary Degree

    On October 30, 1921, J. H. Dillard, the rector of the College of William and Mary, confers an honorary degree on President Warren G. Harding. Dillard served on the Board of Visitors from 1918 until 1940.

    Citation: Dillard Family Papers, 1717–1964, Accession #9498. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: October 30, 1921

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

  • Telegram Concerning Dillard University

    A May 27, 1934, telegram from officials at Xavier University in New Orleans congratulates J. H. Dillard on the impending opening of a new African American university named in his honor. Dillard University, which combined New Orleans University and Straight College into one institution, was chartered in 1930 but did not commence operation until the autumn of 1935. Xavier University was a historically black, Catholic institution initially established as a secondary school by Sister Katherine Drexel. (Drexel, who founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament, was later canonized as a saint.) In the telegram, the Xavier officials compare Dillard to Drexel, since both have "been to the Negro cause through the years a light shining in darkness." 

    Citation: Dillard Family Papers, 1717–1964, Accession #9498. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: Reverend Edward F. Murphy, Sister Madeline Sophie, and the faculty of Xavier University

    Created: May 27, 1934

    Medium: Telegram

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

  • J. H. Dillard at Talladega College

    The educational reformer J. H. Dillard, at center, is dressed in academic garb on the occasion of a talk he delivered on April 3, 1934, at Talladega College, a historically black college in Alabama. Buell Gallagher, the president of the college, writes above the photograph and thanks Dillard for his "kindly and gracious words … [that] have given wings of hope."

    Citation: Dillard Family Papers, 1717–1964, Accession #9498. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: April 3, 1934

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections