Media: Slideshow

Military Officers in Charge of Virginia During Reconstruction

Major General John M. Schofield

Major General John M. Schofield is the subject of this three-quarter-length portrait made at Mathew B. Brady's National Photographic Art Gallery in Washington, D.C. Schofield served as the military commander of Virginia from March 13, 1867, until June 2, 1868, and as the secretary of war under President Andrew Johnson from June 1, 1868, until March 13, 1869.

Original Author: Brady National Photographic Art Gallery

Created: ca. 1865

Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress

General George Stoneman

Union general George Stoneman, a cavalry officer who roomed at West Point with the future Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, is photographed at an encampment near Fair Oaks in June 1862. After the Civil War, Stoneman served as the military commander of Virginia from June 2, 1868, to March 31, 1869. He later took command of the Department of Arizona, but was relieved of his duties in 1871. Stoneman moved to California, where he was elected governor in 1882.

Original Author: James F. Gibson

Created: June 1862

Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative, one half of stereograph

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

General Alexander S. Webb

Union general Alexander S. Webb, recipient of the Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Battle of Gettysburg, is the subject of this photographic portrait taken at Mathew B. Brady's National Photographic Art Gallery in Washington, D.C. After the Civil War, Webb commanded the First Military District of Virginia April 220, 1869. Webb later became the president of the City College of New York, a position he held for thirty-three years.

Original Author: Brady National Photographic Art Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Created: Between 1863 and 1865

Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Major General E. R. S. Canby

E. R. S. Canby, a major general of volunteers in the Union army, poses for a three-quarter-length portrait by Theodore Lilienthal, a well-known nineteenth-century New Orleans photographer. After the Civil War, Canby commanded the First Military District of Virginia from April 20, 1869, until military rule and Reconstruction ended in Virginia on January 26, 1870. He later fought in the Indian Wars and was assassinated in 1873 during a peace conference with the Modoc Indians in California.

Original Author: Theodore Lilienthal

Created: Probably 1864

Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

Zoom In
  • Major General John M. Schofield

    Major General John M. Schofield is the subject of this three-quarter-length portrait made at Mathew B. Brady's National Photographic Art Gallery in Washington, D.C. Schofield served as the military commander of Virginia from March 13, 1867, until June 2, 1868, and as the secretary of war under President Andrew Johnson from June 1, 1868, until March 13, 1869.

    Original Author: Brady National Photographic Art Gallery

    Created: ca. 1865

    Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress

  • General George Stoneman

    Union general George Stoneman, a cavalry officer who roomed at West Point with the future Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, is photographed at an encampment near Fair Oaks in June 1862. After the Civil War, Stoneman served as the military commander of Virginia from June 2, 1868, to March 31, 1869. He later took command of the Department of Arizona, but was relieved of his duties in 1871. Stoneman moved to California, where he was elected governor in 1882.

    Original Author: James F. Gibson

    Created: June 1862

    Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative, one half of stereograph

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • General Alexander S. Webb

    Union general Alexander S. Webb, recipient of the Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Battle of Gettysburg, is the subject of this photographic portrait taken at Mathew B. Brady's National Photographic Art Gallery in Washington, D.C. After the Civil War, Webb commanded the First Military District of Virginia April 220, 1869. Webb later became the president of the City College of New York, a position he held for thirty-three years.

    Original Author: Brady National Photographic Art Gallery, Washington, D.C.

    Created: Between 1863 and 1865

    Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

  • Major General E. R. S. Canby

    E. R. S. Canby, a major general of volunteers in the Union army, poses for a three-quarter-length portrait by Theodore Lilienthal, a well-known nineteenth-century New Orleans photographer. After the Civil War, Canby commanded the First Military District of Virginia from April 20, 1869, until military rule and Reconstruction ended in Virginia on January 26, 1870. He later fought in the Indian Wars and was assassinated in 1873 during a peace conference with the Modoc Indians in California.

    Original Author: Theodore Lilienthal

    Created: Probably 1864

    Medium: Wet collodion glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division