Media: Slideshow

Members of the Richmond Howitzers

Richmond Howitzers in Charles Town

Members of the 1st Company of the Richmond Howitzers pose for a photograph in Charles Town, Virginia (later West Virginia), in 1859. Among those pictured in this hand-colored ambrotype is George Wythe Randolph, seated at right. The grandson of former U.S. president Thomas Jefferson and the son of Virginia governor Thomas Mann Randolph Jr., Randolph had largely shunned politics, but John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in October 1859 radicalized him. Randolph organized the Richmond Howitzers, a light-artillery unit armed with short-range howitzers converted from naval use, and marched it to Charles Town, where the unit contributed to prison security during Brown's trial and, in December, his execution.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: 1859

Medium: Hand-colored sixth-plate ambrotype

Courtesy of The Museum of the Confederacy

Unidentified Member of the Richmond Howitzers

An unidentified member of 1st Company, Richmond Howitzer Battalion, drapes a cape or coat over his shoulder in this hand-colored ambrotype by the Richmond photographer Charles R. Rees. This image is part of the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress.

Original Author: Charles R. Rees

Created: Between 1861 and 1865

Medium: Hand-colored sixth-plate ambrotype

Courtesy of Library of Congress

Confederate Private William Savage Moore

Confederate private William Savage Moore poses in uniform in this hand-colored ambrotype made by the Richmond photographer Charles R. Rees between 1862 and 1865. A facing frame contains a lock of hair, probably from the soldier. Moore and his twin brother, John C. Moore, joined the Parker Light Artillery of the Confederate army on March 14, 1862, in Richmond. At sixteen years old, they required but did not have their mother’s consent to enlist. She took up a letter-writing campaign to have them released for being, in her words, "very sickly and delicately constituted," and the two were discharged due on October 8, 1862.

After turning eighteen, William Moore reenlisted on July 1, 1864, and joined the 1st Company, Richmond Howitzers Battalion, a light artillery unit. He was transferred to Company I of the 15th Virginia Infantry, promoted to second lieutenant on March 27, 1865, and then made a captain a few days later. During the siege of Petersburg, Moore was wounded in the left arm and taken prisoner. In early April 1865, he was transported to a hospital in Washington, D.C., where he signed an oath of allegiance to the United States and was released.

This image is part of the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress.

Original Author: Charles R. Rees

Created: Between 1862 and 1865

Medium: Hand-colored sixth-plate ambrotype

Courtesy of Library of Congress

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  • Richmond Howitzers in Charles Town

    Members of the 1st Company of the Richmond Howitzers pose for a photograph in Charles Town, Virginia (later West Virginia), in 1859. Among those pictured in this hand-colored ambrotype is George Wythe Randolph, seated at right. The grandson of former U.S. president Thomas Jefferson and the son of Virginia governor Thomas Mann Randolph Jr., Randolph had largely shunned politics, but John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in October 1859 radicalized him. Randolph organized the Richmond Howitzers, a light-artillery unit armed with short-range howitzers converted from naval use, and marched it to Charles Town, where the unit contributed to prison security during Brown's trial and, in December, his execution.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: 1859

    Medium: Hand-colored sixth-plate ambrotype

    Courtesy of The Museum of the Confederacy

  • Unidentified Member of the Richmond Howitzers

    An unidentified member of 1st Company, Richmond Howitzer Battalion, drapes a cape or coat over his shoulder in this hand-colored ambrotype by the Richmond photographer Charles R. Rees. This image is part of the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress.

    Original Author: Charles R. Rees

    Created: Between 1861 and 1865

    Medium: Hand-colored sixth-plate ambrotype

    Courtesy of Library of Congress

  • Confederate Private William Savage Moore

    Confederate private William Savage Moore poses in uniform in this hand-colored ambrotype made by the Richmond photographer Charles R. Rees between 1862 and 1865. A facing frame contains a lock of hair, probably from the soldier. Moore and his twin brother, John C. Moore, joined the Parker Light Artillery of the Confederate army on March 14, 1862, in Richmond. At sixteen years old, they required but did not have their mother’s consent to enlist. She took up a letter-writing campaign to have them released for being, in her words, "very sickly and delicately constituted," and the two were discharged due on October 8, 1862.

    After turning eighteen, William Moore reenlisted on July 1, 1864, and joined the 1st Company, Richmond Howitzers Battalion, a light artillery unit. He was transferred to Company I of the 15th Virginia Infantry, promoted to second lieutenant on March 27, 1865, and then made a captain a few days later. During the siege of Petersburg, Moore was wounded in the left arm and taken prisoner. In early April 1865, he was transported to a hospital in Washington, D.C., where he signed an oath of allegiance to the United States and was released.

    This image is part of the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress.

    Original Author: Charles R. Rees

    Created: Between 1862 and 1865

    Medium: Hand-colored sixth-plate ambrotype

    Courtesy of Library of Congress