Media: Slideshow

Illustrations in Mary Johnston's To Have and to Hold

"He Lay Where He Fell, Dazed by the Blow"

An illustration by E. B. Thompson in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the scene in which the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, comes upon a Virginia colonist who is trying to forcibly kiss a young English woman who has been imported for marriage. Percy strikes the assailant, and then turns to the woman and asks for her hand in marriage. The woman—Lady Jocelyn Leigh, a ward of the king of England— has hidden her true identity but agrees to marry Percy.

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: E. B. Thompson

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"'Come Away!' I Said"

An illustration by Emlen McConnell in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the scene in which Lady Jocelyn Leigh reveals her true identity to her husband, Captain Ralph Percy. After revealing her secret, she faints and is tended to by an enslaved woman named Angela. Percy tells his indentured servant Diccon, who is standing behind him, to "Come away!" and leave the two women alone.

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: Emlen McConnell

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"'Of a Quite Sinister Beauty, My Lord'"

An illustration by A. W. Betts in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the scene in which the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, is offered wine by his nemesis, Lord Carnal. The host provides a special glass for Percy—a "green and gold and twisted bauble" that the hero admires. "The tint is wonderful," he says, "as lucent a green as the top of the comber that is to break and overwhelm you … I find it of a quite sinister beauty, my lord."

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: A. W. Betts

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"Mast and All Went Overboard"

An illustration by Emlen McConnell in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts a mastless boat being cast about on a stormy sea. The hero and heroine of the novel, Captain Ralph Percy and his wife, Lady Jocelyn, are attempting to flee the English colony at Jamestown. With them on the boat are Percy's former indentured servant, Diccon; minister Jeremy Sparrow; and the dastardly Lord Carnal, whom they have taken prisoner. The small craft is destroyed during the storm, and the passengers are shipwrecked on a nearby island.

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: Emlen McConnell

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"'Why Don't You End It?'"

The frontispiece of Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900), by the renowned artist Howard Pyle, depicts the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, dueling with a pirate. This is the last of three sword fights against pirate opponents, all of which Percy wins. His final victim, shown here, admits defeat by asking Percy, "Why don't you end it?" Percy decides to spare the pirate's life if he makes Percy the group's new captain, an offer the pirate accepts.

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: Howard Pyle

Created: 1900

Medium: Oil on canvas

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"For Some Time We Said No Word"

An illustration by E. B. Thompson in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, and his wife as they sit on a beach at the edge of a forest. This scene is a momentary respite for the couple, who were shipwrecked during an attempted escape from Virginia and are now traveling on a ship with bloodthirsty pirates. In order to take on supplies, the pirate ship stops at a tropical "islet, shaped like the cresent moon."

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: E. B. Thompson

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"'Sit Down, My Lord'"

An illustration in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts a scene in which Jocelyn Leigh Percy stands before Virginia governor Sir Francis Wyatt and defends her husband, Captain Ralph Percy, who is being held prisoner. She wins her husband's release.

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622 and makes use of real-life characters such as Governor Sir Francis Wyatt. This image was probably made by the well-known illustrator Howard Pyle.

Original Author: Probably Howard Pyle

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

"'Thou Art Her Murderer!'"

An illustration by Emlen McConnell in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the final encounter between the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, and his nemesis, Lord Carnal. Percy—certain that Carnal is responsible for his wife's death—tries to engage the lord in a duel. Before they can complete the fight, however, Carnal collapses into a chair, fatally ill with a dose of poison he had consumed.

Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

Original Author: Emlen McConnell

Created: 1900

Medium: Book illustration

Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

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  • "He Lay Where He Fell, Dazed by the Blow"

    An illustration by E. B. Thompson in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the scene in which the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, comes upon a Virginia colonist who is trying to forcibly kiss a young English woman who has been imported for marriage. Percy strikes the assailant, and then turns to the woman and asks for her hand in marriage. The woman—Lady Jocelyn Leigh, a ward of the king of England— has hidden her true identity but agrees to marry Percy.

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: E. B. Thompson

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "'Come Away!' I Said"

    An illustration by Emlen McConnell in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the scene in which Lady Jocelyn Leigh reveals her true identity to her husband, Captain Ralph Percy. After revealing her secret, she faints and is tended to by an enslaved woman named Angela. Percy tells his indentured servant Diccon, who is standing behind him, to "Come away!" and leave the two women alone.

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: Emlen McConnell

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "'Of a Quite Sinister Beauty, My Lord'"

    An illustration by A. W. Betts in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the scene in which the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, is offered wine by his nemesis, Lord Carnal. The host provides a special glass for Percy—a "green and gold and twisted bauble" that the hero admires. "The tint is wonderful," he says, "as lucent a green as the top of the comber that is to break and overwhelm you … I find it of a quite sinister beauty, my lord."

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: A. W. Betts

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "Mast and All Went Overboard"

    An illustration by Emlen McConnell in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts a mastless boat being cast about on a stormy sea. The hero and heroine of the novel, Captain Ralph Percy and his wife, Lady Jocelyn, are attempting to flee the English colony at Jamestown. With them on the boat are Percy's former indentured servant, Diccon; minister Jeremy Sparrow; and the dastardly Lord Carnal, whom they have taken prisoner. The small craft is destroyed during the storm, and the passengers are shipwrecked on a nearby island.

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: Emlen McConnell

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "'Why Don't You End It?'"

    The frontispiece of Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900), by the renowned artist Howard Pyle, depicts the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, dueling with a pirate. This is the last of three sword fights against pirate opponents, all of which Percy wins. His final victim, shown here, admits defeat by asking Percy, "Why don't you end it?" Percy decides to spare the pirate's life if he makes Percy the group's new captain, an offer the pirate accepts.

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: Howard Pyle

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Oil on canvas

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "For Some Time We Said No Word"

    An illustration by E. B. Thompson in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, and his wife as they sit on a beach at the edge of a forest. This scene is a momentary respite for the couple, who were shipwrecked during an attempted escape from Virginia and are now traveling on a ship with bloodthirsty pirates. In order to take on supplies, the pirate ship stops at a tropical "islet, shaped like the cresent moon."

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: E. B. Thompson

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "'Sit Down, My Lord'"

    An illustration in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts a scene in which Jocelyn Leigh Percy stands before Virginia governor Sir Francis Wyatt and defends her husband, Captain Ralph Percy, who is being held prisoner. She wins her husband's release.

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622 and makes use of real-life characters such as Governor Sir Francis Wyatt. This image was probably made by the well-known illustrator Howard Pyle.

    Original Author: Probably Howard Pyle

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library

  • "'Thou Art Her Murderer!'"

    An illustration by Emlen McConnell in Mary Johnston's novel To Have and to Hold (1900) depicts the final encounter between the hero, Captain Ralph Percy, and his nemesis, Lord Carnal. Percy—certain that Carnal is responsible for his wife's death—tries to engage the lord in a duel. Before they can complete the fight, however, Carnal collapses into a chair, fatally ill with a dose of poison he had consumed.

    Johnston's best-selling novel is set in colonial Virginia in 1621 and 1622.

    Original Author: Emlen McConnell

    Created: 1900

    Medium: Book illustration

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Library