Media: Slideshow

Radical Republican Party in Richmond

Richmond Radical Republicans at the Convention of 1867–1868

A political cartoon in the Southern Opinion, published on December 7, 1867, mocks the slate of Radical Republicans elected from Richmond to the Convention of 1867–1868, which was then in session. Delegate Lewis Lindsey, a former slave and a professional bandleader, is depicted blowing a horn and dancing barefoot on the "Constitution of District 1." Flanking Lindsey are (at left) James Morrisey, an Irish grocer who clutches a jug of liquor, and the Reverend James Hunnicutt, a Baptist preacher. Joseph Cox, the other African American delegate representing Richmond, stands in back. The satirical caption notes that the fifth delegate, the white judge John Underwood, "has repaired to Morrisey's grocery to get another 'horn'—stimulants having run low."

Original Author: Torsoh, engraver

Created: December 7, 1867

Medium: Engraving

Courtesy of Library of Virginia

Voting for Richmond Delegates to the Convention of 1867–1868

This chart shows the voting breakdown in Richmond for delegates to the Convention of 1867–1868. The slate of five Republican candidates—two African American Radicals and three white men—won the election by securing almost all of the black vote. Compiled by the Richmond Dispatch on October 30, 1867, the chart was published in Richard Lee Morton's The Negro in Virginia Politics, 1865–1902 (1919). Morton noted that 5,382 white voters were registered, compared to 6,284 black voters, leading to "a contest … between the white race and the black race."  

Citation: The Negro in Virginia Politics, 1865–1902, E185.93 .V8 M8 1919, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: Richard Lee Morton

Created: 1919

Medium: Printed page

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

Zoom In
  • Richmond Radical Republicans at the Convention of 1867–1868

    A political cartoon in the Southern Opinion, published on December 7, 1867, mocks the slate of Radical Republicans elected from Richmond to the Convention of 1867–1868, which was then in session. Delegate Lewis Lindsey, a former slave and a professional bandleader, is depicted blowing a horn and dancing barefoot on the "Constitution of District 1." Flanking Lindsey are (at left) James Morrisey, an Irish grocer who clutches a jug of liquor, and the Reverend James Hunnicutt, a Baptist preacher. Joseph Cox, the other African American delegate representing Richmond, stands in back. The satirical caption notes that the fifth delegate, the white judge John Underwood, "has repaired to Morrisey's grocery to get another 'horn'—stimulants having run low."

    Original Author: Torsoh, engraver

    Created: December 7, 1867

    Medium: Engraving

    Courtesy of Library of Virginia

  • Voting for Richmond Delegates to the Convention of 1867–1868

    This chart shows the voting breakdown in Richmond for delegates to the Convention of 1867–1868. The slate of five Republican candidates—two African American Radicals and three white men—won the election by securing almost all of the black vote. Compiled by the Richmond Dispatch on October 30, 1867, the chart was published in Richard Lee Morton's The Negro in Virginia Politics, 1865–1902 (1919). Morton noted that 5,382 white voters were registered, compared to 6,284 black voters, leading to "a contest … between the white race and the black race."  

    Citation: The Negro in Virginia Politics, 1865–1902, E185.93 .V8 M8 1919, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: Richard Lee Morton

    Created: 1919

    Medium: Printed page

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections