Media: Slideshow

National Woman's Party

National Woman's Party Leaders

In a photograph taken on June 2, 1920, the chairman and officers of the National Woman's Party, a militant organization promoting woman suffrage, hold up a sign with the admonition promulgated by Susan B. Anthony in 1872 and 1894: "No self respecting woman should wish or work for the success of a party that ignores her sex." The women pose in front of the Washington headquarters of the National Woman's Party before leaving for the Republican Party's national convention in Chicago. From left to right are Sue White, Benigna Green Kalb, Mrs Jas Rector, Mary Dubrow, Chairman Alice Paul, and Elizabeth Kalb.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: June 2, 1920

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress

Clerical Workers at the Headquarters of the National Woman's Party

In a photograph taken about 1920, three clerical workers sort through the card index files at the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the National Woman's Party, a militant organization promoting woman suffrage.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: ca. 1920

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of Library of Congress

Messenger for the National Woman's Party

In a photograph taken on October 21, 1922, Julia Obear delivers messages by bicycle for the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the National Woman's Party, a militant organization promoting woman suffrage. All staff members were women, a condition imposed by Alva Belmont, a wealthy socialite who funded the party and served as its president from 1917 to 1921.

Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

Created: October 21, 1922

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of Library of Congress

Ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment

In a photograph taken on August 18, 1920, Alice Paul, chairman of the National Woman's Party, unfurls a flag with thirty-six stars from the balcony of the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the suffragist organization. On that day Tennessee became the thirty-sixth state to ratify the proposed Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, thereby completing the amendment's ratification and giving women the right to vote. 

Original Author: Harris & Ewing, photographer

Created: August 18, 1920

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

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  • National Woman's Party Leaders

    In a photograph taken on June 2, 1920, the chairman and officers of the National Woman's Party, a militant organization promoting woman suffrage, hold up a sign with the admonition promulgated by Susan B. Anthony in 1872 and 1894: "No self respecting woman should wish or work for the success of a party that ignores her sex." The women pose in front of the Washington headquarters of the National Woman's Party before leaving for the Republican Party's national convention in Chicago. From left to right are Sue White, Benigna Green Kalb, Mrs Jas Rector, Mary Dubrow, Chairman Alice Paul, and Elizabeth Kalb.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: June 2, 1920

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress

  • Clerical Workers at the Headquarters of the National Woman's Party

    In a photograph taken about 1920, three clerical workers sort through the card index files at the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the National Woman's Party, a militant organization promoting woman suffrage.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: ca. 1920

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of Library of Congress

  • Messenger for the National Woman's Party

    In a photograph taken on October 21, 1922, Julia Obear delivers messages by bicycle for the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the National Woman's Party, a militant organization promoting woman suffrage. All staff members were women, a condition imposed by Alva Belmont, a wealthy socialite who funded the party and served as its president from 1917 to 1921.

    Original Author: National Photo Company Collection

    Created: October 21, 1922

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of Library of Congress

  • Ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment

    In a photograph taken on August 18, 1920, Alice Paul, chairman of the National Woman's Party, unfurls a flag with thirty-six stars from the balcony of the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the suffragist organization. On that day Tennessee became the thirty-sixth state to ratify the proposed Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, thereby completing the amendment's ratification and giving women the right to vote. 

    Original Author: Harris & Ewing, photographer

    Created: August 18, 1920

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division