Media: Slideshow

Gallery of Photographs by The Browns Studio

Two African American Children

In a portrait taken by George W. Brown in the early twentieth century, two unidentified children stand next to a table. The older child, dressed in high button shoes, hat, and fur-trimmed coat, holds a piece of paper in her hand, while the younger child is posed with mortar and pestle, and a measured bottle partially filled with liquid. Although there is no caption with the photograph, the photographer may have intended to create a scene in which the younger child plays a pharmacist and the older child a customer. This photograph was made in Brown's photographic studio at 603 North Second Street in the Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond.  

Original Author: George Willis Brown

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Two Unidentified Men

In a photo-postcard made by George W. Brown sometime between 1906 to 1910, two unidentified African American men pose with cigarettes in their hands. The Browns photo studio was located at 603 North Second Street in the heart of the Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond. The studio chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Original Author: George Willis Brown

Created: ca. 1906–1910

Medium: Photographic postcard

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Unidentified Woman

An unidentified woman stands next to a chair in this photo-postcard by George W. Brown, a photographer whose family studio was located at 603 North Second Street in the heart of the Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond. The Browns studio chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Original Author: George Willis Brown

Created: ca. 1906–1910

Medium: Photographic postcard

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Printing Press for the St. Luke Herald

Two African American men attend to a linotype machine used to print the St. Luke Herald, a newspaper produced by the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal organization in Richmond. Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order, established the newspaper in 1902 in order to spread news of the organization. 

This photograph was taken in the early twentieth century by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

Maggie Walker and Staff Members of the Independent Order of Saint Luke

Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal society, sits at center, second row from top, among staff members of the council office in Richmond. This photograph was taken in 1915 by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: 1915

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

James E. Jackson Jr.

Baby James E. Jackson Jr. is propped up against a furry blanket in this photograph taken at the Richmond photographic studio run by the George O. Brown family. Young Jackson would become the first African American Eagle Scout in the south.

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Armstrong High School Woodworking Class

A teacher (at back) supervises students in a woodworking class at Arnmstrong High School, the first African American public school in Richmond. This photograph was taken about 1915 by George Brown of The Browns photo studio, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. The photograph was taken by either the son or grandson of the studio's founder, George O. Brown.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: George Brown

Created: ca. 1915

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

Office of the Principal of Armstrong High School

W. W. Townsend, principal of Armstrong High School in Richmond, sits at his roll top desk in his office. Two secretaries assist the prinicpal with his work.This image was taken about 1930 by George Brown of The Browns photo studio, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. The photograph was taken by either the son or grandson of the studio's founder, George O. Brown.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: George Brown

Created: ca. 1930

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

World War I Veterans

African American veterans from World War I gather at Morris Cafeteria in Richmond on August 4, 1919. This photograph was taken by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: August 4, 1919

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of Witherspoon Collection, The Valentine

African American Couple

An unidentified African American couple, the woman in pearls, the man in dark suit and tie, pose for a photograph taken at The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Virginia Union University Drama Production

Student actors in costume enact a scene from William Shakepeare's The Merchant of Venice in a production at Virginia Union University about 1920. This photograph was taken by George Brown of The Browns photo studio, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. The photograph was taken by either the son or grandson of the studio's founder, George O. Brown.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: George Brown

Created: ca. 1920

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

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  • Two African American Children

    In a portrait taken by George W. Brown in the early twentieth century, two unidentified children stand next to a table. The older child, dressed in high button shoes, hat, and fur-trimmed coat, holds a piece of paper in her hand, while the younger child is posed with mortar and pestle, and a measured bottle partially filled with liquid. Although there is no caption with the photograph, the photographer may have intended to create a scene in which the younger child plays a pharmacist and the older child a customer. This photograph was made in Brown's photographic studio at 603 North Second Street in the Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond.  

    Original Author: George Willis Brown

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Two Unidentified Men

    In a photo-postcard made by George W. Brown sometime between 1906 to 1910, two unidentified African American men pose with cigarettes in their hands. The Browns photo studio was located at 603 North Second Street in the heart of the Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond. The studio chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Original Author: George Willis Brown

    Created: ca. 1906–1910

    Medium: Photographic postcard

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Unidentified Woman

    An unidentified woman stands next to a chair in this photo-postcard by George W. Brown, a photographer whose family studio was located at 603 North Second Street in the heart of the Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond. The Browns studio chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Original Author: George Willis Brown

    Created: ca. 1906–1910

    Medium: Photographic postcard

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Printing Press for the St. Luke Herald

    Two African American men attend to a linotype machine used to print the St. Luke Herald, a newspaper produced by the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal organization in Richmond. Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order, established the newspaper in 1902 in order to spread news of the organization. 

    This photograph was taken in the early twentieth century by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • Maggie Walker and Staff Members of the Independent Order of Saint Luke

    Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal society, sits at center, second row from top, among staff members of the council office in Richmond. This photograph was taken in 1915 by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: 1915

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • James E. Jackson Jr.

    Baby James E. Jackson Jr. is propped up against a furry blanket in this photograph taken at the Richmond photographic studio run by the George O. Brown family. Young Jackson would become the first African American Eagle Scout in the south.

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Armstrong High School Woodworking Class

    A teacher (at back) supervises students in a woodworking class at Arnmstrong High School, the first African American public school in Richmond. This photograph was taken about 1915 by George Brown of The Browns photo studio, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. The photograph was taken by either the son or grandson of the studio's founder, George O. Brown.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: George Brown

    Created: ca. 1915

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • Office of the Principal of Armstrong High School

    W. W. Townsend, principal of Armstrong High School in Richmond, sits at his roll top desk in his office. Two secretaries assist the prinicpal with his work.This image was taken about 1930 by George Brown of The Browns photo studio, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. The photograph was taken by either the son or grandson of the studio's founder, George O. Brown.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: George Brown

    Created: ca. 1930

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • World War I Veterans

    African American veterans from World War I gather at Morris Cafeteria in Richmond on August 4, 1919. This photograph was taken by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: August 4, 1919

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of Witherspoon Collection, The Valentine

  • African American Couple

    An unidentified African American couple, the woman in pearls, the man in dark suit and tie, pose for a photograph taken at The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Virginia Union University Drama Production

    Student actors in costume enact a scene from William Shakepeare's The Merchant of Venice in a production at Virginia Union University about 1920. This photograph was taken by George Brown of The Browns photo studio, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. The photograph was taken by either the son or grandson of the studio's founder, George O. Brown.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: George Brown

    Created: ca. 1920

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine