Media: Slideshow

McKim, Mead & White Architectural Plans

Front Elevation, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

An 1896 architectural drawing by the firm of McKim, Mead & White shows the plan for the recreation of the south facade of the Rotunda, the centerpiece of Thomas Jefferson's design for the University of Virginia. A fire in October of 1895 destroyed the Rotunda, and the eminent New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White—with Stanford White leading the design team—restored and, in some aspects, modified the original design of the building.

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: April 9, 1896

Medium: Architectural drawing

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Schedule of Shelving for the Library of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Va

A detailed 1897 architectural blueprint shows the plan for three tiers of shelving for the library inside the newly renovated Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The shelves on the left are all seven-feet high, so that the women pictured in academic caps (presumably librarians, since the school was all-male at that time) could reach for any book without need of a step ladder. The shelving on the right side however, reaches all the way to the ceiling on each floor—extending as high as nine feet three inches on the second gallery—and required the use of stepladders. The renowned New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with partner Stanford White heading the team of architects, re-designed Jefferson's original library and turned it into a double-height space to accommodate the expanding collection of books.

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: February 24, 1897

Medium: Architectural blueprint

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Plan of Ceiling Light of Dome, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

In this 1896 architectural blueprint, images of eagles are part of the elaborate design surrounding the skylight atop the dome of the Rotunda. Originally designed by Thomas Jefferson as the centerpiece of the University of Virginia, the Rotunda burned down in 1895 and was rebuilt by the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with renowned architect Stanford White leading the team of designers.

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: December 19, 1896

Medium: Architectural blueprint

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Basement Plan, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

An 1896 architectural plan shows the configuration of rooms in the basement (known today as the ground floor) of the restored Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The building was destroyed by fire in 1895, and the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with renowned architect Stanford White leading the design team, was hired to rebuild, and in some ways modify the Rotunda. In this plan the two elliptical spaces at center were designated as lecture rooms. In the 1830s and 1840s there had been an additional elliptical space, just below the lavatories shown here, which was the site of Jefferson's Natural History Museum. That museum conisted of "some of Mr. Jefferson's collections of curiosities, Indian utensils & dresses & weapons & a part of a mammoth's skeleton," as visitor Ann Maury recorded in her diary in October 1831. 

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: April 9, 1896

Medium: Architectural drawing

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Side Elevation, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

An 1896 architectural plan shows a side view of the restored Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The building was destroyed by fire in 1895, and the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with renowned architect Stanford White leading the design team, was hired to rebuild, and in some ways modify the Rotunda. The newly modeled Rotunda retained the Corinthian columns of Jefferson's original design and replicated his south side facade (at the left of the drawing); Stanford White, however, designed a Beaux-Arts-inspired forecourt on the north side of the building.

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: April 9, 1896

Medium: Architectural drawing

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Central Portion - Academical Building, University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Va.

An 1896 blueprint shows the central portion of the Academical Building (later known as Cabell Hall) at the University of Virginia as designed by Stanford White of the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White. Cabell Hall contained a public hall, and was one of three buildings that closed off the south end of the Lawn, which had been left open in Thomas Jefferson's original design. 

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: July 2, 1896

Medium: Architectural blueprint

Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, Physical Laboratory, Front Elevation

An 1896 architectural plan shows the exterior of the Physical Laboratory (later known as Rouss Hall) at the University of Virginia as designed by Stanford White of the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White. The detailed drawing notes the materials to be used in the construction: copper for the roof, cement for the pediment, and brick arches over the first floor windows with decorative cement keys at the center of them. Three statues of unidentified figures are shown at the entrance and the drawing notes that there are to be "ornamented mouldings" around the cornice of the building.

Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

Created: April 16, 1896

Medium: Architectural drawing

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

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  • Front Elevation, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

    An 1896 architectural drawing by the firm of McKim, Mead & White shows the plan for the recreation of the south facade of the Rotunda, the centerpiece of Thomas Jefferson's design for the University of Virginia. A fire in October of 1895 destroyed the Rotunda, and the eminent New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White—with Stanford White leading the design team—restored and, in some aspects, modified the original design of the building.

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: April 9, 1896

    Medium: Architectural drawing

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

  • Schedule of Shelving for the Library of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Va

    A detailed 1897 architectural blueprint shows the plan for three tiers of shelving for the library inside the newly renovated Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The shelves on the left are all seven-feet high, so that the women pictured in academic caps (presumably librarians, since the school was all-male at that time) could reach for any book without need of a step ladder. The shelving on the right side however, reaches all the way to the ceiling on each floor—extending as high as nine feet three inches on the second gallery—and required the use of stepladders. The renowned New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with partner Stanford White heading the team of architects, re-designed Jefferson's original library and turned it into a double-height space to accommodate the expanding collection of books.

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: February 24, 1897

    Medium: Architectural blueprint

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

  • Plan of Ceiling Light of Dome, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

    In this 1896 architectural blueprint, images of eagles are part of the elaborate design surrounding the skylight atop the dome of the Rotunda. Originally designed by Thomas Jefferson as the centerpiece of the University of Virginia, the Rotunda burned down in 1895 and was rebuilt by the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with renowned architect Stanford White leading the team of designers.

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: December 19, 1896

    Medium: Architectural blueprint

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

  • Basement Plan, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

    An 1896 architectural plan shows the configuration of rooms in the basement (known today as the ground floor) of the restored Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The building was destroyed by fire in 1895, and the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with renowned architect Stanford White leading the design team, was hired to rebuild, and in some ways modify the Rotunda. In this plan the two elliptical spaces at center were designated as lecture rooms. In the 1830s and 1840s there had been an additional elliptical space, just below the lavatories shown here, which was the site of Jefferson's Natural History Museum. That museum conisted of "some of Mr. Jefferson's collections of curiosities, Indian utensils & dresses & weapons & a part of a mammoth's skeleton," as visitor Ann Maury recorded in her diary in October 1831. 

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: April 9, 1896

    Medium: Architectural drawing

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

  • Side Elevation, Restoration of Rotunda, University of Virginia

    An 1896 architectural plan shows a side view of the restored Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The building was destroyed by fire in 1895, and the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, with renowned architect Stanford White leading the design team, was hired to rebuild, and in some ways modify the Rotunda. The newly modeled Rotunda retained the Corinthian columns of Jefferson's original design and replicated his south side facade (at the left of the drawing); Stanford White, however, designed a Beaux-Arts-inspired forecourt on the north side of the building.

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: April 9, 1896

    Medium: Architectural drawing

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

  • Central Portion - Academical Building, University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Va.

    An 1896 blueprint shows the central portion of the Academical Building (later known as Cabell Hall) at the University of Virginia as designed by Stanford White of the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White. Cabell Hall contained a public hall, and was one of three buildings that closed off the south end of the Lawn, which had been left open in Thomas Jefferson's original design. 

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: July 2, 1896

    Medium: Architectural blueprint

    Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

  • University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, Physical Laboratory, Front Elevation

    An 1896 architectural plan shows the exterior of the Physical Laboratory (later known as Rouss Hall) at the University of Virginia as designed by Stanford White of the New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White. The detailed drawing notes the materials to be used in the construction: copper for the roof, cement for the pediment, and brick arches over the first floor windows with decorative cement keys at the center of them. Three statues of unidentified figures are shown at the entrance and the drawing notes that there are to be "ornamented mouldings" around the cornice of the building.

    Citation: McKim, Mead & White architectural drawings, RG-31/1/2:2.872, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

    Original Author: McKim, Mead & White

    Created: April 16, 1896

    Medium: Architectural drawing

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections