Media: Slideshow

African American Schools in Post–Civil War Richmond

Richmond Colored Normal School

African Americans pose in front of the Richmond Colored Normal School at Twelfth and Leigh streets, a building constructed with the financial support of the Freedmen's Bureau. The facility operated both as a normal school to train teachers and as a regular high school. Among the graduates of the school were J. Andrew Bowler, who became a prominent African American educator, and Maggie Lena Walker, a successful black entrepreneur and civic leader.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: Probably late nineteenth to early twentieth century

Medium: Glass-plate negative; one half of stereograph

Courtesy of Cook Collection, The Valentine

Educational Progress in Virginia—The Schools for Colored Children in Richmond.

A page from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, published on July 21, 1883, includes a montage of colored engravings depicting school life for African American children in Virginia. The illustrations, at top, show the all-black Navy Hill School in Richmond, which was established at the end of the Civil War and later became the first Richmond public school to employ African American teachers. At the bottom of the page, African American teachers ring a school bell to summon students, while others teach inside a classroom. Navy Hill became prominent for the caliber of both its teachers and its students. 

Original Author: C. Upham, artist

Created: July 21, 1883

Medium: Colored engravings

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

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  • Richmond Colored Normal School

    African Americans pose in front of the Richmond Colored Normal School at Twelfth and Leigh streets, a building constructed with the financial support of the Freedmen's Bureau. The facility operated both as a normal school to train teachers and as a regular high school. Among the graduates of the school were J. Andrew Bowler, who became a prominent African American educator, and Maggie Lena Walker, a successful black entrepreneur and civic leader.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: Probably late nineteenth to early twentieth century

    Medium: Glass-plate negative; one half of stereograph

    Courtesy of Cook Collection, The Valentine

  • Educational Progress in Virginia—The Schools for Colored Children in Richmond.

    A page from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, published on July 21, 1883, includes a montage of colored engravings depicting school life for African American children in Virginia. The illustrations, at top, show the all-black Navy Hill School in Richmond, which was established at the end of the Civil War and later became the first Richmond public school to employ African American teachers. At the bottom of the page, African American teachers ring a school bell to summon students, while others teach inside a classroom. Navy Hill became prominent for the caliber of both its teachers and its students. 

    Original Author: C. Upham, artist

    Created: July 21, 1883

    Medium: Colored engravings

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society