Media: Slideshow

Maggie Lena Walker and the Independent Order of St. Luke

Maggie Walker and the Juvenile Branch of the Independent Order of Saint Luke

Maggie Lena Walker is flanked by Mattie Dawson (left), and Emeline Johnson (right), officers in the Juvenile Branch of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, a black fraternal organization based in Richmond. As grand matron of the Independent Order, Walker established the Juvenile Branch to help instill a sense of community and confidence in young African Americans. This photograph was made by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. 

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

Independent Order of Saint Luke's Staff

Staff members work inside the office of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal organization in Richmond. The calendar on the wall suggests that this image was probably made in June 1921. It was taken by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Probably June 1921

Medium: Photograph

Courtesy of National Park Service, Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site

Printing Press for the St. Luke Herald

Two African American men attend to a linotype machine used to print the St. Luke Herald, a newspaper produced by the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal organization in Richmond. Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order, established the newspaper in 1902 in order to spread news of the organization. 

This photograph was taken in the early twentieth century by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

Saint Luke Penny Savings Bank

Maggie Lena Walker, founder of the Saint Luke Penny Savings Bank, in Richmond, stands behind the teller's cage with bank cashier Emmett C. Burke and her son Russell Walker. A sign above them announces that the bank is insured against burglary by the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland. Another sign to the right advertises safe deposit boxes for rent. Inside the teller's cage, a notice advises customers that a notary public "with seal" is available. A portrait of Walker hangs on the wall at upper left.

This photograph was taken in the early twentieth century by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: Early twentieth century

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

Maggie Walker and Staff Members of the Independent Order of Saint Luke

Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal society, sits at center, second row from top, among staff members of the council office in Richmond. This photograph was taken in 1915 by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

Created: 1915

Medium: Mounted photographic print

Courtesy of The Valentine

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  • Maggie Walker and the Juvenile Branch of the Independent Order of Saint Luke

    Maggie Lena Walker is flanked by Mattie Dawson (left), and Emeline Johnson (right), officers in the Juvenile Branch of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, a black fraternal organization based in Richmond. As grand matron of the Independent Order, Walker established the Juvenile Branch to help instill a sense of community and confidence in young African Americans. This photograph was made by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations. 

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • Independent Order of Saint Luke's Staff

    Staff members work inside the office of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal organization in Richmond. The calendar on the wall suggests that this image was probably made in June 1921. It was taken by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Probably June 1921

    Medium: Photograph

    Courtesy of National Park Service, Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site

  • Printing Press for the St. Luke Herald

    Two African American men attend to a linotype machine used to print the St. Luke Herald, a newspaper produced by the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal organization in Richmond. Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order, established the newspaper in 1902 in order to spread news of the organization. 

    This photograph was taken in the early twentieth century by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • Saint Luke Penny Savings Bank

    Maggie Lena Walker, founder of the Saint Luke Penny Savings Bank, in Richmond, stands behind the teller's cage with bank cashier Emmett C. Burke and her son Russell Walker. A sign above them announces that the bank is insured against burglary by the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland. Another sign to the right advertises safe deposit boxes for rent. Inside the teller's cage, a notice advises customers that a notary public "with seal" is available. A portrait of Walker hangs on the wall at upper left.

    This photograph was taken in the early twentieth century by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: Early twentieth century

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • Maggie Walker and Staff Members of the Independent Order of Saint Luke

    Maggie Lena Walker, grand secretary of the Independent Order of Saint Luke, an African American fraternal society, sits at center, second row from top, among staff members of the council office in Richmond. This photograph was taken in 1915 by The Browns studio in Richmond, which chronicled the city's black community for several generations.

    Citation: Witherspoon Collection, Valentine Richmond History Center

    Original Author: The Browns photo studio, Richmond

    Created: 1915

    Medium: Mounted photographic print

    Courtesy of The Valentine