Encyclopedia Virginia: Music http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/img/EV_Logo_sm.gif Encyclopedia Virginia This is the url http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org The first and ultimate online reference work about the Commonwealth /Billy_Billy_or_Blind_ca_1805-1855 Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:43:17 EST Billy or Blind Billy (ca. 1805–1855) http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Billy_Billy_or_Blind_ca_1805-1855 Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:43:17 EST]]> /Blind_Billy_Death_Notice_Richmond_Daily_Dispatch_April_23_1855 Fri, 05 May 2017 11:41:18 EST <![CDATA[Blind Billy Death Notice, Richmond Daily Dispatch (April 23, 1855)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Blind_Billy_Death_Notice_Richmond_Daily_Dispatch_April_23_1855 Fri, 05 May 2017 11:41:18 EST]]> /Sound_in_Jefferson_s_Virginia Tue, 25 Oct 2016 16:13:42 EST <![CDATA[Sound in Jefferson's Virginia]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Sound_in_Jefferson_s_Virginia Sound in Thomas Jefferson's Virginia included natural, man-made, and melodic noises. The areas surrounding Monticello, the Albemarle County estate of Jefferson, and the city of Charlottesville, reverberated with thunder, cicadas, bells, work songs, fiddles, and drums. Nearby taverns, parlors, dances, and political rallies resonated with the sounds of crowd noises, toasts, songs, military salutes, fireworks, and shouts. Jefferson's world was as noisy as any small town of its time, filled with the sounds of nature (especially cicadas), Western art music, political music, and the sounds of the enslaved. In taverns, patrons sang drinking songs and patriotic tunes. In parlors, young women performed with keyboards and lutes. At dances, men played fiddles, and in the military, they participated in fife and drum corps. In slave quarters, enslaved men and women, though regularly ignored, sang spirituals and played fiddles and drums, sometimes to communicate with one another.
Tue, 25 Oct 2016 16:13:42 EST]]>
/Edwards_Thomas_J_Tommy_1922-1969 Tue, 26 Jul 2016 17:31:28 EST <![CDATA[Edwards, Tommy (1922–1969)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Edwards_Thomas_J_Tommy_1922-1969 Tommy Edwards was a singer and songwriter best known for his 1958 chart-topping single "It's All in the Game." Edwards showed musical promise early, hosting a Richmond radio show in his teens. By 1943 he was writing songs in New York and scored a hit with "That Chick's Too Young to Fry." Edwards began a recording career that peaked in 1958 with "It's All in the Game." The runaway hit led to a series of charting singles over the next two years and appearances on national television shows. His career declined as his balladeer style fell out of favor with musical trends. His signature song remains a classic years after his death and has been included in many music compilations.
Tue, 26 Jul 2016 17:31:28 EST]]>
/Carter_Maybelle_1909-1978 Tue, 01 Mar 2016 16:46:19 EST <![CDATA[Carter, Maybelle (1909–1978)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Carter_Maybelle_1909-1978 Maybelle Carter was a member of the Carter Family, a trio that helped to pioneer what became known as country music. Born in Scott County, in Southwest Virginia, she grew up playing music and learning traditional Appalachian songs and tunes. She also developed a distinctive style of guitar playing that combined rhythmic chords and thumb-plucked melody that was dubbed the "Carter lick." With her first cousin Sara Carter and Carter's husband, A. P. Carter, Maybelle Carter formed the Carter Family, recording for the first time at the Bristol Sessions of 1927. The group made nearly 300 records in a career that lasted until the early 1940s, and for several years they performed on ultrahigh-frequency border radio. These broadcasts could be heard across North America and helped make the group nationally famous. After the Carter Family disbanded in 1943, Maybelle Carter continued to perform with her three daughters, as Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters. She joined the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, and later toured with Johnny Cash, her daughter June Carter's third husband. Later in life Carter continued to perform and appear on television and came to be known as the Mother of Country Music. She died in 1978.
Tue, 01 Mar 2016 16:46:19 EST]]>
/Carter_Sara_1898-1979 Tue, 01 Mar 2016 16:42:29 EST <![CDATA[Carter, Sara (1898–1979)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Carter_Sara_1898-1979 Sara Carter was a member of the Carter Family, a trio that helped to pioneer what became known as country music. Born and raised in Southwest Virginia, Sara Dougherty sang and played the autoharp from an early age. In 1915, she married the salesman A. P. Carter, who sang bass and collected and arranged songs. With Maybelle Carter—Sara Carter's first cousin and the wife of A. P. Carter's brother—the couple formed the Carter Family, recording for the first time at the Bristol Sessions of 1927. The group made nearly 300 records in a career that lasted until the early 1940s, and for several years they performed on ultrahigh-frequency border radio. These broadcasts could be heard across North America and helped make the group nationally famous. With the Carter Family's success, Sara Carter's marriage became strained. In 1933 she and A. P. Carter separated; three years later they divorced but continued to perform together. In 1941, she remarried and the next year moved to California, leaving her three children in Virginia with A. P. Carter. Sara Carter spent the rest of her life in California, reuniting briefly with her former husband in the 1950s to perform with two of their children. In 1966 she recorded an album with Maybelle Carter. Sara Carter died in 1979 and was buried near her first husband in Virginia.
Tue, 01 Mar 2016 16:42:29 EST]]>
/Carter_A_P_1891-1960 Tue, 01 Mar 2016 16:39:55 EST <![CDATA[Carter, A. P. (1891–1960)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Carter_A_P_1891-1960 A. P. Carter was a song collector and member of the Carter Family, a trio that helped to pioneer what became known as country music. Born in Scott County, in Southwest Virginia, Carter worked as a carpenter and traveling salesman before marrying Sara Dougherty in 1915. Carter's true passion had always been music, and with his new wife, who sang and played the autoharp, he began to perform and audition to make recordings. With Maybelle Carter—Sara Carter's first cousin and the wife of A. P. Carter's brother—the couple formed the Carter Family, recording for the first time at the Bristol Sessions of 1927. The group made nearly 300 records in a career that lasted until the early 1940s, and for several years they performed on ultrahigh-frequency border radio. These broadcasts could be heard across North America and helped make the group nationally famous. Many of the songs the Carter Family performed had been collected and arranged by A. P. Carter, who often spent weeks at a time combing the Virginia countryside for material, absences that, along with the fame, took a toll on his marriage. He and Sara Carter divorced in 1936 but continued to record together until 1941. The next year she moved to California, leaving behind their three children. With the Carter Family dissolved, A. P. Carter returned to Scott County, where he opened a general store, reuniting briefly with his former wife in the 1950s to perform with two of their children. Carter died in 1960 and was buried near Sara Carter in Virginia.
Tue, 01 Mar 2016 16:39:55 EST]]>
/Cash_June_Carter_1929-2003 Thu, 18 Feb 2016 17:09:39 EST <![CDATA[Cash, June Carter (1929–2003)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Cash_June_Carter_1929-2003 June Carter Cash was a country and folk singer and the wife of Johnny Cash. Born in southwestern Virginia, she was the daughter of Maybelle Carter, who with her first cousin Sara Carter and Carter's husband, A. P. Carter, performed with the pioneering country group the Carter Family. June Carter and her two sisters began singing with the group on the radio in 1939 and later as part of Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters. Carter often supplemented her music with large doses of humor, drawing on broad caricatures of her rural upbringing. Her satirical version of "Baby, It's Cold Outside," recorded in 1949 with the duo Homer and Jethro, reached No. 9 on the country chart. The next year Carter joined the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, and late in 1961, along with her family, accompanied the country star Johnny Cash on tour. Although both were married, Cash and Carter soon became romantically linked and were married in 1968. They won two Grammy Awards for their performances together: for "Jackson" in 1968 and "If I Were a Carpenter" in 1970. Both suffered from drug addiction, and while their marriage and careers suffered at times, they remained together. In 2000, Carter Cash won a Grammy Award for her second solo album, Press On. She died in May 2003 and her husband followed in September of that year.
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/Cline_Patsy_1932-1963 Tue, 04 Nov 2014 10:13:11 EST <![CDATA[Cline, Patsy (1932–1963)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Cline_Patsy_1932-1963 Tue, 04 Nov 2014 10:13:11 EST]]> /Letter_from_Thomas_Jefferson_to_Giovanni_Fabbroni_June_8_1778 Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:51:26 EST <![CDATA[Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Giovanni Fabbroni (June 8, 1778)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Letter_from_Thomas_Jefferson_to_Giovanni_Fabbroni_June_8_1778 Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:51:26 EST]]> /Letter_from_Thomas_Jefferson_to_Martha_Jefferson_Randolph_April_4_1790 Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:54:07 EST <![CDATA[Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Martha Jefferson Randolph (April 4, 1790)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Letter_from_Thomas_Jefferson_to_Martha_Jefferson_Randolph_April_4_1790 Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:54:07 EST]]> /Letter_from_Jacob_Rubsamen_to_Thomas_Jefferson_December_1_1780 Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:38:42 EST <![CDATA[Letter from Jacob Rubsamen to Thomas Jefferson (December 1, 1780)]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Letter_from_Jacob_Rubsamen_to_Thomas_Jefferson_December_1_1780 Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:38:42 EST]]> /Bristol_Sessions_1927_The Thu, 13 Sep 2012 14:52:40 EST <![CDATA[Bristol Sessions (1927), The]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Bristol_Sessions_1927_The The Bristol Sessions occurred in 1927 when the Victor Talking Machine Company brought a field unit to Bristol, Tennessee/Virginia, to record musicians from the region. Victor held the sessions on the second and third floors of the Taylor-Christian Hat Company building at 408 State Street on the Tennessee side of Bristol's main thoroughfare, which also serves as the Tennessee-Virginia border. Director Ralph Peer and the Victor engineers recorded fiddle tunes, sacred songs, string bands, harmonica solos, and others from July 25 to August 5. Celebrated as the session that produced the first recordings of country music legends Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family, the session also featured artists who had made previous recordings for other record labels. The session captured on 78-rpm commercial recordings an excellent cross section of the styles of music present in the Blue Ridge Mountains and Appalachian regions.
Thu, 13 Sep 2012 14:52:40 EST]]>
/Rye_Cove_Cyclone Tue, 23 Nov 2010 12:52:06 EST <![CDATA[Rye Cove Cyclone]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Rye_Cove_Cyclone The Rye Cove Cyclone is the deadliest tornado in Virginia history. Part of an unusual outbreak of tornadoes across the eastern United States on May 2, 1929, it hit the Rye Cove School in the Appalachian highlands of Scott County in the southwestern part of the state, killing twelve students and one teacher and injuring fifty-four. Tornadoes also hit two school houses in Bath County later that day, but both schools had already dismissed students for the day. Scott County native A. P. Carter, of the singing group the Carter Family, volunteered to help in the wake of the tragedy, and the group recorded "The Cyclone of Rye Cove" later that year. The school's 1929–1930 term was canceled, and a memorial school dedicated in 1930.
Tue, 23 Nov 2010 12:52:06 EST]]>
/Wreck_of_the_Old_97 Thu, 09 Sep 2010 11:54:12 EST <![CDATA[Wreck of the Old 97]]> http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Wreck_of_the_Old_97 The wreck of the Old 97 occurred on September 27, 1903, when the Southern Railway freight train called the Fast Mail (or "Old 97") left the tracks and crashed at the Stillhouse Trestle outside Danville, Virginia, killing eleven people. The accident became a sensation, with thousands of spectators at the scene, newspaper stories, and even a series of musical ballads, the most popular of which became a hit on the country music charts in 1924.
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