Primary Resource

"Influenza Still Raging." (December 6, 1918)

In "Influenza Still Raging," published by the Clinch Valley News on December 6, 1918, the editors warn that the risks of the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919 remain. They report that there are hundreds of cases in nearby countries and sketch the many ways the virus could arrive in Tazewell.

Transcription from Original

The statement made by the papers recently that the "flu" had abated, seems to have been somewhat premature. Reports from Roanoke, Bluefield, and some other cities, state that the epidemic still exists, or has broken out afresh. The authorities of the city of Roanoke are talking of closing the schools unless teachers and all school officers and the citizens generally observe strictly prescribed rules for prevention. It is reported that there are hundreds of cases in Pocahontas and many in Graham and Bluefield. There are still a number of cases scattered over the county.

Schools May Close.

Should the "flu" appear again in this town it may be necessary to again close the schools and other places of public meeting. However, if proper precautions are taken there is little danger, but there is still some danger. Nearly every incoming train brings people from infected districts outside. Members of families visit around. Men and boys who are working in the coalfields come home to see their families, and in this way the disease may get to town. Precaution—Prevention are the magic words. Everybody ought to know by this time how to prevent it. Teachers in the schools must exercise eternal vigilance. Children suspected should be sent home and the family physician notified. Parents must be on guard. No pupil from infected families, even suspicious cases, should be sent to school. Unless the rules and warnings of the Board of health are heeded, there may be trouble and the services of the undertaker needed.

Be on the lookout every hour of the day.