Primary Resource

AN ACT to restrict the jurisdiction of the Court of Claims (July 4, 1864)

In "AN ACT to restrict the jurisdiction of the Court of Claims," passed on July 4, 1864 and sometimes known as the limiting act, the U.S. Congress limits the payment of claims for compensation for the destruction of Union armies to residents of non-Confederate states.

Transcription from Original

AN ACT to restrict the jurisdiction of the Court of Claims, and to provide for the payment of certain demands for quartermasters' stores and subsistence supplies to the Army of the United States.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the jurisdiction of the Court of Claims shall not extend to or include any claim against the United States growing out of the destruction or appropriation of, or damage to, property by the Army or Navy, or any part of the Army or Navy, engaged in the suppression of the rebellion, from the commencement to the close thereof.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That all claims of loyal citizens, in States not in rebellion, for quartermasters' stores actually furnished to the Army of the United States, and receipted for by the proper officer receiving the same, or which may have been

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 taken by such officers without giving such receipt, may be submitted to the Quartermaster-General of the United States, accompanied with such proofs as each claimant can present of the facts in his case; and it shall be the duty of the Quartermaster-General to cause such claim to be examined, and if convinced that it is just, and of the loyalty of the claimant, and that the stores have been actually received or taken for the use of and used by said Army, then to report each case to the Third Auditor of the Treasury, with a recommendation for settlement.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That all claims of loyal citizens in States not in rebellion, for subsistence actually furnished to said Army, and receipted for by the proper officer receiving the same, or which may have been taken by such officers without giving such receipt, may be submitted to the Commissary-General of Subsistence, accompanied with such proof as each claimant may have to offer; and it shall be the duty of the Commissary-General of Subsistence to cause each claim to be examined, and if convinced that it is just, and of the loyalty of the claimant, and that the stores have been received or taken actually for the use of and used by said Army, then to report each case for payment to the Third Auditor of the Treasury, with a recommendation for settlement.

Approved July 4, 1864.