Media: Slideshow

Ku Klux Klan in Virginia

Ku Klux Klan Official

W. Clyde Maddox, a bookkeeper and a member of the Ku Klux Klan, poses in his official regalia in 1921. KKK members usually wore white gowns—symbols of "purity" and the "righteousness of Christ and Christianity to the Klansman," according to historian Chester L. Quarles—but as the Klan grew larger, leaders of the group began wearing robes of different colors. Maddox, shown here in a dark robe, held the position of First Exalted Cyclops in Richmond Klan No. 1. In 1922 a faction of this group seceded from the national organization and reconstituted itself as the Anglo-Saxon Club No. 1. Maddox became president of the Richmond branch of the Anglo-Saxon Club. This glass-plate image was made by Walter Washington Foster, who ran the premier photographic studio in the city.

Original Author: Walter Washington Foster

Created: 1921

Medium: Glass-plate negative

Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

Ku Klux Klan Parade in Richmond

Wearing white robes and hoods, members of the Ku Klux Klan, a right-wing extremist organization, parade on Grace Street in Richmond circa 1925. This photograph was taken at the intersection of Grace and Fifth streets, just a few blocks from the Virginia State Capitol.

Original Author: Dementi Studio, Richmond

Created: ca. 1925

Medium: Photograph

Courtesy of The Valentine

Poster for Klan Rally

A poster advertises a Ku Klux Klan rally held on July 8,1966, near the town of Concord in Campbell County. "The White Public Only!!" is invited to the event, which was organized by M. R. Kornegay, identified at the bottom of the poster as Grand Dragon of the Virginia Realm. Kornegay had recently been sent from North Carolina by the United Klans of America to foster Klan activity in Virginia.

Original Author: United Klans of America

Created: 1966

Medium: Printed broadside

Courtesy of Library of Virginia

Ballston KKK Band No. 6 Realm of Virginia

Members of the Ballston Ku Klux Klan band, including several children who sit in front, pose for an unknown photographer. This photograph may have been taken in 1930 when the band joined a convocation of Klansmen who assembled from Ballston, Potomac, Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Charlottesville, Fairfax, Occoquan, and from Maryland.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: First half of twentieth century

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections

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  • Ku Klux Klan Official

    W. Clyde Maddox, a bookkeeper and a member of the Ku Klux Klan, poses in his official regalia in 1921. KKK members usually wore white gowns—symbols of "purity" and the "righteousness of Christ and Christianity to the Klansman," according to historian Chester L. Quarles—but as the Klan grew larger, leaders of the group began wearing robes of different colors. Maddox, shown here in a dark robe, held the position of First Exalted Cyclops in Richmond Klan No. 1. In 1922 a faction of this group seceded from the national organization and reconstituted itself as the Anglo-Saxon Club No. 1. Maddox became president of the Richmond branch of the Anglo-Saxon Club. This glass-plate image was made by Walter Washington Foster, who ran the premier photographic studio in the city.

    Original Author: Walter Washington Foster

    Created: 1921

    Medium: Glass-plate negative

    Courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society

  • Ku Klux Klan Parade in Richmond

    Wearing white robes and hoods, members of the Ku Klux Klan, a right-wing extremist organization, parade on Grace Street in Richmond circa 1925. This photograph was taken at the intersection of Grace and Fifth streets, just a few blocks from the Virginia State Capitol.

    Original Author: Dementi Studio, Richmond

    Created: ca. 1925

    Medium: Photograph

    Courtesy of The Valentine

  • Poster for Klan Rally

    A poster advertises a Ku Klux Klan rally held on July 8,1966, near the town of Concord in Campbell County. "The White Public Only!!" is invited to the event, which was organized by M. R. Kornegay, identified at the bottom of the poster as Grand Dragon of the Virginia Realm. Kornegay had recently been sent from North Carolina by the United Klans of America to foster Klan activity in Virginia.

    Original Author: United Klans of America

    Created: 1966

    Medium: Printed broadside

    Courtesy of Library of Virginia

  • Ballston KKK Band No. 6 Realm of Virginia

    Members of the Ballston Ku Klux Klan band, including several children who sit in front, pose for an unknown photographer. This photograph may have been taken in 1930 when the band joined a convocation of Klansmen who assembled from Ballston, Potomac, Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Charlottesville, Fairfax, Occoquan, and from Maryland.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: First half of twentieth century

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of University of Virginia Special Collections