Media: Slideshow

Henry Buckland's Career

William Buckland

William Buckland, an architect and a builder who originally came to Virginia as an indentured servant, holds a drafting pen in this portrait by Charles Willson Peale. On the table in front of Buckland is an architectural sketch of his final commission, the Hammond-Harwood House, in Annapolis, Maryland. (The monumental colonnaded building in the background of the painting bears no resemblance to the Annapolis house.) Peale began this portrait in 1774, but Buckland died before it was finished. At the behest of Buckland's daughter, Peale completed the painting fifteen years later. This portrait is part of the Mabel Brady Garvan Collection at the Yale University Art Gallery.

Original Author: Charles Willson Peale

Created: 1774, reworked 1789

Medium: Oil on canvas

Courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery

Palladian Room

The formal, Palladian-style room in Gunston Hall features rococo woodwork. Two gifted English indentured servants, carpenter and joiner William Buckland and master carver William Bernard Sears, were responsible for the interior work, helping to make Gunston Hall one of the finest homes in colonial America.

Original Author: Louise Kraft

Created: 2010

Medium: Photograph

Courtesy of Gunston Hall

Buckland and Sears Chair

This mid-eighteenth-century chair is attributed to William Buckland and William Bernard Sears, two skilled craftsmen who had been imported from England as indentured servants to create the intricate carvings for which George Mason’s home, Gunston Hall, is famous. This is the only documented chair created by the pair and it is believed to be their first collaboration. This was one of a set of chairs used in the mansion's Chinese Room. Buckland designed the carvings in the house, and Sears generally did the actual woodwork.

Original Author: William Buckland and William Bernard Sears

Created: Mid-eighteenth century

Medium: Wooden chair

Courtesy of Gunston Hall

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  • William Buckland

    William Buckland, an architect and a builder who originally came to Virginia as an indentured servant, holds a drafting pen in this portrait by Charles Willson Peale. On the table in front of Buckland is an architectural sketch of his final commission, the Hammond-Harwood House, in Annapolis, Maryland. (The monumental colonnaded building in the background of the painting bears no resemblance to the Annapolis house.) Peale began this portrait in 1774, but Buckland died before it was finished. At the behest of Buckland's daughter, Peale completed the painting fifteen years later. This portrait is part of the Mabel Brady Garvan Collection at the Yale University Art Gallery.

    Original Author: Charles Willson Peale

    Created: 1774, reworked 1789

    Medium: Oil on canvas

    Courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery

  • Palladian Room

    The formal, Palladian-style room in Gunston Hall features rococo woodwork. Two gifted English indentured servants, carpenter and joiner William Buckland and master carver William Bernard Sears, were responsible for the interior work, helping to make Gunston Hall one of the finest homes in colonial America.

    Original Author: Louise Kraft

    Created: 2010

    Medium: Photograph

    Courtesy of Gunston Hall

  • Buckland and Sears Chair

    This mid-eighteenth-century chair is attributed to William Buckland and William Bernard Sears, two skilled craftsmen who had been imported from England as indentured servants to create the intricate carvings for which George Mason’s home, Gunston Hall, is famous. This is the only documented chair created by the pair and it is believed to be their first collaboration. This was one of a set of chairs used in the mansion's Chinese Room. Buckland designed the carvings in the house, and Sears generally did the actual woodwork.

    Original Author: William Buckland and William Bernard Sears

    Created: Mid-eighteenth century

    Medium: Wooden chair

    Courtesy of Gunston Hall