• American Civil War in VirginiaA broad overview of Virginia's oversized, critical role in America's bloodiest conflict. Our entry includes a run-down of familiar battles and leaders, but readers will also find information on less-known topics, such as Confederate civil liberties and slavery and freedom in this time of huge transitions. How did J. E. B. Stuart get revenge on his Unionist father-in-law? Read and find out. (Image courtesy of Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division)
  • Colonial VirginiaA broad overview of Virginia life from the founding of Jamestown in 1607 to the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Our entry includes information on everything from Virginia Indians and the establishment of slavery to the importance of religion and the role of women. For those wondering, for instance, how tobacco brought self-government to Virginia, this is a good place to start. (Image courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)
  • Virginia's First Africans"20. and odd Negroes." They arrived in 1619, having been stolen at sea from a Portuguese slave ship. Our entry explains some surprising truths about their probable lives in Africa and what happened to them once they were in Virginia. (Image courtesy of the Library of Virginia)
  • St. George TuckerProminent jurist, part-time poet. St. George Tucker led a remarkable life: he smuggled goods during the Revolution and served under Washington at Yorktown. He became one of the English-speaking world's first professors of law and wrote the first treatise on American law. Plus he wrote gobs of poetry. Find the text of one, "To Sleep," that recalls falling asleep with his beloved wife, who had just died. (Image courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)
  • Buck v. Bell (1927)"Three generations of imbeciles are enough." So declared Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes in his 1927 ruling that Virginia could sterilize Carrie E. Buck (at left), whom it deemed feebleminded and promiscuous. Our entry walks readers through the details and implications of this decision and how it relates to the burgeoning eugenics movement. The connection to Nazi Germany is especially unsettling. (Image courtesy of SUNY Albany)
  • Edgar Allan Poe"Only this, and nothing more." Raised in Richmond, Edgar Allan Poe became one of the most important writers in American history. So many of his stories and poems have become legendary, but what do you know about his stint at the head of Virginia's influential magazine the Southern Literary Messenger? Our entry also uncovers a fraudulent Poe photo and gives readers a virtual tour of a Poe museum in Richmond. (Image courtesy of the University of Virginia Special Collections)