• Massive ResistanceNo to desegregation.. Rather than comply with the U.S. Supreme Court's mandate to desegregate public schools, Virginia adopted a policy known as Massive Resistance. Public schools were shut down in Front Royal, Charlottesville, and Norfolk rather than see white kids mingling with their black peers. As our entry suggests, it left a deep and lasting negative imprint on Virginia, one that can still be felt today. (Image courtesy of the Valentine Richmond History Center)
  • Sir Walter RaleighElizabeth's favorite. Sir Walter Raleigh was an English solder, explorer, and poet who famously wooed Queen Elizabeth I. In fact, it was for his queen that he named Virginia in 1585, financing three expeditions to the Outer Banks of what is now North Carolina. Our entry is a full portrait of the dapper and controversial Raleigh, and includes several selections of his writing. (Image courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.)
  • Virtual Tours As if you're there. Working with Google's Earth Outreach team, Encyclopedia Virginia has created virtual tours of more than a dozen historic sites across Virginia, from Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest to the Anne Spencer House and Garden to Bacon's Castle. Explore the spaces as if you were actually walking through them and then use our resource to read up on their historical context. (Image courtesy of Google)
  • Gabriel Archer (ca. 1574–ca. 1610)A Catholic at Jamestown? New archaeological discoveries suggest that Archer, one of the original Jamestown settlers, may have been secretly Catholic. As more scholarship is done, we will update our entry. For now, it provides an authoritative summary of Archer's eventful life. (Archer's grave, second from right; photograph courtesy Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation/Preservation Virginia)